• 26May
    Sun protection

    The number of skin cancer cases is going upward every year. The good news is there has been an explosion of sun protection products to prevent the disease.  As the number of people who are becoming aware of the need for sun protection is increasing, sunscreen lotions and creams are taking the lion’s share of sun protection products in the market.

    Hundreds of sunscreen brands are claiming to be the best sunscreens in the business making it confusing for many customers. The question as to which sunscreen is best for you can be answered by understanding what sunscreens are for, what they are made of, and how you should use them.

    Sunscreen is a chemical used to prevent ultraviolet radiation from hurting the skin. UVA and UVB are two types of ultraviolet radiation that can damage the skin and cause skin cancer. UVA penetrates more into the skin compared to the latter and is known to be the main cause of skin wrinkling, sagging, and skin cancer itself. UVB on the other hand causes sunburn. Though sunscreens may not totally get rid of any UV damage to the skin, it can protect the skin when used properly.

    UVA protection can be measured on a ranking of 1-4, low to high. When you see “broad spectrum” in a sunscreens label, it means that it contains chemicals like Zinc Oxide, Parsol, and Mexoryl that prevents radiation from penetrating the skin. Some sunscreens also have a chemical called Helioplex which can make other chemicals last longer in the skin.

    You may also want to look at SPF, or Sun Protection Factor. SPF is used to measure the ability of a sunscreen to prevent UV Radiation from damaging the skin. To make it easier to understand, the more SPF’s the better. Some sunscreens come with an SPF 15 which blocks approximately 93% of UVB rays. The best sunscreens have higher SPF’s that can block 93-99% of UV Radiation. It remains a fact however, that no sunscreen can really protect you a hundred percent from UV rays.

    Sunscreens come in many forms including creams, gels, sprays, moisturizers, and more. The choice depends on what you think will feel good on your skin and which is easier to apply. If you are planning on swimming or doing activities that will make you sweat a lot, look for water resistant sunscreens.

    Sunscreens can be weighed by their ability to protect against UVA and UVB Radiation. As a general rule, always look for “broad spectrum”, “water resistant”, and “SPF”. Aside from those three, you also need to know that no sunscreen is expected to stay in effect for longer than two hours, meaning you need to reapply before the time is up.

    Sometimes the effectiveness of even the best sunscreens in the market depends on how you use them, where you use them, and how long you stay under the sun. If you carefully consider these things, then choosing the best sunscreen for sun protection is an easy task.

    Image by ktylerconk via Flickr

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  • 18Aug

    Not all sunscreens are created equal. Listen to an explanation of how they
    work to reduce the risk of sunburn, early skin aging and cancer. And read
    the Consumer Update at
    http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm258416.htm

    Duration : 0:2:37

    Read more »

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  • 04Aug

    Concealer. Cleanser. Sunscreen. Blush. Moisturizer. The list of ointments and makeup that women can apply to their face goes on and on, and the order in which they should be applied isn’t so intuitive. Should you apply your sunscreen first or last? What about everything else? Dr. Schultz will explain the proper order for applying everything and why.

    Transcription:

    The most common mistake that women make in using their sunscreen is not putting it on first on their skin before their moisturizer and their make-up. Many women think, and I understand, that if their sunscreen is closer to the sun on top of their other products, then it will work better and protect them better from the sun. But the reality is, for sunscreens to work, they have to be the first thing applied to the skin because they have to bind to the skin, and there’s a chemical reaction that occurs that makes the sunscreen effective. So please put your sunscreen on first, then apply your moisturizer and then apply your make-up.

    http://DermTV.com

    Connect with DermTV:

    http://www.facebook.com/dermtv

    http://www.twitter.com/dermtv

    Everyone can have beautiful, healthy, and younger looking skin, and DermTV, the Internet’s daily skincare video show, will demonstrate how by revealing expert tips and techniques and by providing real solutions for real skincare issues.

    Skincare (whether cosmetic or medical) previously required a trip to your dermatologist or a shopping spree at the pharmacy. And that’s if you have a trusted nearby dermatologist or a local informed pharmacy. But not anymore. We at DermTV are committed to making best-in-class dermatology and skincare guidance accessible to everyone, anytime, at your computer.

    Every weekday, our host, Dr. Neal Schultz, one of New York’s most trusted and respected dermatologists (see bio below), teaches skincare’s most timely and timeless issues. Topics include: the best at home techniques and new technology for facial rejuvenation, preventing and fixing sun damage from wrinkles to skin cancer, breaking news in dermatology, general skincare topics, and more.

    Duration : 0:1:9

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  • 14Jul

    Visit http://CaulfieldsCounter.com for skincare advice and product reviews.
    Jerome explains what the the differences are between mineral and chemical sunscreens. Products used in this video were:
    Alba Botanica Fragrance Free Mineral Protection SPF 30 Sunscreen
    Banana Boat Sport SPF 30 Sunscreen

    Like us on Facebook:

    http://www.facebook.com/caulfieldscounter

    Follow us on Twitter:
    http://twitter.com/LookGoodGetSome

    Duration : 0:4:4

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  • 14Jul

    First and foremost, it’s better to use some sunscreen (even if it’s not the right one) than no sunscreen at all. But if you have a choice, should you use one with “broad spectrum” protection? What’s the difference between UV-A and UV-B? Dr. Schultz will explain what the key terms on sunscreen labels mean and how to determine which sunscreen is right for you.

    Transcription:
    In this segment of DermTV.com, I’m going to help you choose the correct sunscreen to protect your skin. Why do you need sunscreen? Because the only way you can get premature lines, wrinkles or age spots on your skin is by exposing it to the sun without adequate protection. And the lack of that same adequate protection is what causes skin cancer. Unfortunately, one American dies every hour in the United States from skin cancer. The good news is that it is a completely preventable disease. All you have to do is choose and use the correct sunscreen. The criteria for the correct sunscreen are: it needs to be strong enough; it needs to feel good when you put it on so you’ll be inclined to re-apply it, which is very important; and it has to be compatible with your facial skin type. What is strong enough? Two parts to that answer because there are two parts to the damaging rays of the sun. The UVA or ultraviolet A rays cause aging and skin cancer. To choose a sunscreen that will give you protection from that, choose one that’s marked simply with UVA protection or with broad-spectrum protection. For the UVB or burning rays from the sun, I recommend a sunscreen with an SPF of between 15 and 30. SPF simply means how long you can stay in the sun without getting a burn, and it also tells you about the percentage of protection that that sunscreen gives you. So, an SPF of 15, if it takes you 10 minutes on a nice summer day to develop a burn in the sun, an SPF of 15 will allow you to stay in the sun for 10 x 15 or 150 minutes, 2½ hours. And, it also will give you 88% protection from those burning rays. Similarly, an SPF of 30 allows you to stay in the sun for 300 minutes, almost 5 hours, and gives you 95% protection from the burning rays of the sun. This dermatologist finds it very compelling to not recommend sunscreens more than 30 because the upside is merely 3 or 4% of additional protection but, as SPFs increase, we know their thickness increases so they become less pleasant to put on and we’re less apt to re-apply them. The second criteria in choosing your sunscreen is that you want it to feel good when you put it on, so you will re-apply it because that’s a very important part of your sun protection. So, since increasing SPF means increased thickness and makes the sunscreen feel not as good, I recommend sunscreens with an SPF of between 15 and 30 which gives you between 88 and 95% protection that feels good when you put it on, so you’ll be more inclined to use it, re-apply it 3, 4, 5 times a day, rather than putting on a higher SPF sunscreen that’s thicker, less pleasant, and you don’t re-apply after the first use in the morning. Lastly, we want to make sure that your sunscreen is compatible with your facial skin type because, if you have oily or acne-prone skin, you don’t want your sunscreen to aggravate your acne. You don’t want it to make you break out, so you want to make sure that it’s labeled either water-based, oil-free, or that it just doesn’t clog your pores. For your body sunscreen, choose a lotion rather than a cream. They just spread more easily. Again, it’s a function of, you’re just more apt to re-apply it. You now have enough information to choose the correct sunscreen to give you adequate protection so you can safely enjoy yourself in the sun.

    http://DermTV.com

    Connect with DermTV:

    http://www.facebook.com/dermtv

    http://www.twitter.com/dermtv

    Everyone can have beautiful, healthy, and younger looking skin, and DermTV, the Internet’s daily skincare video show, will demonstrate how by revealing expert tips and techniques and by providing real solutions for real skincare issues.

    Skincare (whether cosmetic or medical) previously required a trip to your dermatologist or a shopping spree at the pharmacy. And that’s if you have a trusted nearby dermatologist or a local informed pharmacy. But not anymore. We at DermTV are committed to making best-in-class dermatology and skincare guidance accessible to everyone, anytime, at your computer.

    Every weekday, our host, Dr. Neal Schultz, one of New York’s most trusted and respected dermatologists (see bio below), teaches skincare’s most timely and timeless issues. Topics include: the best at home techniques and new technology for facial rejuvenation, preventing and fixing sun damage from wrinkles to skin cancer, breaking news in dermatology, general skincare topics, and more.

    Duration : 0:4:15

    Read more »

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